20 Feb 2014


Police Shoot, Kill Man's Dog After Going

To Wrong Home, Told

"You Can Get a New Dog" 

An Adams County man is in shock after he says deputies shot and killed his dog.

Jeff Fisher said deputies went to his house by mistake. He said when they forced their way through the door his dog Ziggy ran outside and an Adams County Sheriff's deputy shot and killed him.

"(He went to the door) to see who it was and the police officer shot him three times," Fisher said. "They killed my dog for no reason."

Fisher said Ziggy was his best friend and can't believe he's gone.

"I called the dog, he turned to come back to me and the police officer opened fire," said Fisher.

Ziggy was an 8-year-old Blue Healer/Border Collie mix.

The Adams County Sheriff's Office said deputies responded to the address on reports of a business alarm going off.

A spokesman said he can't say more until the investigation is complete but did release this statement, "It's our goal at the Adams County Sheriff's Office to complete a thorough investigation of this incident, be able to answer any questions that people who have concerns about this incident may have and to do right for the owner of this dog."

Fisher said he wants that deputy to be held accountable.

"I'm on the ground crying hysterically and the police officer says, 'You need to calm down, you can get a new dog,'" said Fisher.

Fisher said he rents space from the neighboring business where the alarm was sounded.

The attorney representing Fisher believes that animal shootings are out of control.

Jennifer Edwards referred to the elk in Boulder and the dog in Commerce City that were recently shot and killed by law enforcement.

"Something has got to be done about it. They're taking our family members and I don't care that they're the furry family members they're family members no less," said Edwards.

Edwards wants answers and reform on how law enforcement deals with animals. She believes a lawsuit is likely.

Fisher said he just wants his friend back, "I don't have kids. That's my son."

Police Shoot, Kill 80-Year-Old Man

In His Own Bed, Don't Find the Drugs

They Were Looking For 

In the early morning hours of June 27, 2013, a team of Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department deputies pulled up to the home of Eugene Mallory, an 80-year-old retired engineer living in the rural outskirts of Los Angeles county with his wife Tonya Pate and stepson Adrian Lamos.

The deputies crashed through the front gate and began executing a search warrant for methamphetamine on the property. Detective Patrick Hobbs, a self-described narcotics expert who claimed he "smelled the strong odor of chemicals" downwind from the house after being tipped off to illegal activity from an anonymous informant, spearheaded the investigation.

The deputies announced their presence, and Pate emerged from the trailer where she'd been sleeping to escape the sweltering summer heat of the California desert. Lamos and a couple of friends emerged from another trailer, and a handyman tinkering with a car on the property also gave himself up without resistance. But Mallory, who preferred to sleep in the house, was nowhere to be seen.

Deputies approached the house, and what happened next is where things get murky. The deputies said they announced their presence upon entering and were met in the hallway by the 80-year-old man, wielding a gun and stumbling towards them. The deputies later changed the story when the massive bloodstains on Mallory's mattress indicated to investigators that he'd most likely been in bed at the time of the shooting. Investigators also found that an audio recording of the incident revealed a discrepancy in the deputies' original narrative: Before listening to the audio recording, [Sgt. John] Bones believed that he told Mallory to "Drop the gun" prior to the shooting. The recording revealed, however, that his commands to "Drop the gun" occurred immediately after the shooting.

When it was all over, Eugene Mallory died of six gunshot wounds from Sgt. John Bones' MP-5 9mm submachine gun. When a coroner arrived, he found the loaded .22 caliber pistol the two deputies claimed Mallory had pointed at them on the bedside table.

Mallory had not fired of a single shot. The raid turned up no evidence of methamphetamine on the property.

To find out more about this case, including details about what the police did find, watch the above video, featuring Mallory's widow Tonya Pate. Pate has filed a wrongful death lawsuit against the Los Angeles Sheriff's Department, an agency plagued by prison abuse scandals, questionable hiring practices, and allegations of racial profiling and harassment in recent years.

The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department declined multiple requests to comment on this story.

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